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11 Feb, 2014

More art found in Nazi loot probe

Posted by: admin In: BBC Arts

Dozens more art works emerge at the house of Cornelius Gurlitt, the collector found with hundreds of paintings believed stolen by the Nazis.

Read the original article on the BBC

11 Feb, 2014

Murray backs Clooney on Elgin Marbles

Posted by: admin In: BBC Arts

The Monuments Men actor Bill Murray backs his co-star and director George Clooney’s view the UK should return the Elgin Marbles to Greece.

Read the original article on the BBC

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Technical drawing of nuclear landmine including chicken box. Image Marcel Helmer

Last week was the School of Design students work in progress exhibition at the Royal College of Art, that’s probably my favourite show at RCA because everything is still gloriously wild, promising and unpolished. Read the rest of this entry »

Starts today!

This week, Resonance 104.4FM is holding its Annual Fund-Raiser, with a series of live events, an on-line auction and special broadcasts. The reason why i’m mentioning it this year is that the radio needs your help even more than in the past : we need to secure £50,000 reserves in order to bolster our next funding application to Arts Council England, who have generously supported us for the last 11 years. The exciting bit: our programme makers and many friends have organised a variety of amazing entertainments for you – all proceeds going to Resonance. With your help we can keep our unique and exceptional broadcast service on air and advert-free!

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Janek Schaefer

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Yuri Suzuki, Garden of Russolo

The whole list of events is over here: Resonance104.4fm’s Annual Fund-Raising Drive. I’d like to point you to a couple of evenings you might enjoy:

There are tons of music events. I know zilch about music but i do know that on Thursday 13 February, Resonance104.4fm has lined-up an impressive series of sound-art performances at Cafe Oto. There will be Janek Schaefer + Rie Nakajima + Yuri Suzuki + post-electronic research group Oscillatorial Binnage. I’ve no idea who curated this event but it’s hard to imagine a more exciting selection. And all that for a very reasonable £8.

Also very tempting is High Tea with Max and Stacy. “Financial war reporter” Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert of The Truth About Markets will be at The Roxy for a high ­finance Q&A. That’s on Sunday 16 February 4pm. Tickets are £15.

So please do come to any or all of these events. Do grab something in the online auction (i’ll link to the page as soon as i have it) or make a donation. Today. Because we really need your help at Resonance104.4fm.

Photo on the homepage: Oscillatorial Binnage at the Merge festival.

Read the original post on We make money not art

06 Feb, 2014

In pictures: LGBT History Month

Posted by: admin In: Tate

Simeon Solomon, 'Sappho and Erinna in a Garden at Mytilene' 1864

Simeon Solomon
Sappho and Erinna in a Garden at Mytilene 1864
Watercolour on paper
support: 330 x 381 mm
Purchased 1980

February is LGBT History Month: a chance to reflect on some of the great lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender artists and art inspired by the LGBT community

In our selection you’ll find a mixture of friends, lovers, fantasies and formal portraits from the last 150 years, revealing the radical changes in LGBT experience over time. Not all the artists were gay or bisexual, but all of these artworks have something to tell us about queer lives and desires.

Find more works like these in Tate’s Collection.

Read the original post on The Great Tate Mod Blog

Speculative Everything. Design, Fiction, and Social Dreaming, by Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby.

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(Available on amazon UK and USA)

Publisher MIT Press writes: Today designers often focus on making technology easy to use, sexy, and consumable. In Speculative Everything, Anthony Dunne and Fiona Raby propose a kind of design that is used as a tool to create not only things but ideas. For them, design is a means of speculating about how things could be–to imagine possible futures. This is not the usual sort of predicting or forecasting, spotting trends and extrapolating; these kinds of predictions have been proven wrong, again and again. Instead, Dunne and Raby pose “what if” questions that are intended to open debate and discussion about the kind of future people want (and do not want). Read the rest of this entry »

The new episode of #A.I.L – artists in laboratories, the weekly radio programme about art and science i present on ResonanceFM, London’s favourite radio art station, is aired tomorrow Wednesday afternoon at 4pm.

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The Biological Bakery, 2014

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Algae Curtain, 2012

My guests in the studio will be Mathias Gmachl and Rachel Wingfield from Loop.pH. The work of the London-based studio speculates on near and far future scenarios as a way to probe at the social and environmental impact of emerging biological and technological futures. Some of their most renown projects include collaborating with a Nobel prize winner to communicate the functioning of molecular machines, designing a curtain made of algae that produce bio-fuel, setting up an edible DIY bio fab-lab for the video of Aussie band Architecture In Helsinki, creating an immersive sound and light performance that explores the field of neuroscience and investigating the possibilities of living architecture.

The radio show will be aired this Wednesday 5 February at 16:00, London time. Early risers can catch the repeat next Tuesday at 6.30 am. If you don’t live in London, you can listen to the online stream or wait till we upload the episodes on soundcloud one day.

Read the original post on We make money not art

04 Feb, 2014

Work of the week: After by Richard Deacon

Posted by: admin In: Tate

Richard Deacon After 1998 Purchased from funds provided by CGNU plc 2002 © Tate
Richard Deacon
After 1998
Wood, steel, aluminium and resin
unconfirmed: 1700 x 9500 x 3000 mm

Purchased from funds provided by CGNU plc 2002 © Tate
View the main page for this artwork

As sculptures of wood, metal, cloth and clay by the expert material manipulator fill the galleries of Tate Britain, we take a closer look at one of the biggest works in this retrospective, the room-sized After

Swell, ripple, undulate and flow: these are just a few of the gut-feelings that emerge when in the presence of Richard Deacon’s wooden sculpture After

Looking at the nearly 10 metre-long floor-standing sculpture, there’s an irresistible urge to imagine yourself as a tiny nimble figure, sliding across its perfectly proportioned planes and smooth strips of wood, as if riding the crest of a giant wave. 

There’s something honest and yet hearty about this sculpture. Its undulating wood mixes rigidity with movement, making a shape suggestive of nature’s various forms in plant, animal or man. Robust, dynamic and lively, there’s a new view at every curve. 

Its steamed and bent strips of wood is one of Deacon’s most distinctive techniques and typifies his affection for working with strips or sheets of materials, avoiding solid or closed forms. Speaking on his work in 1985 Deacon said: 

‘The way that I work, seems to be to start, if not from nothing, from minimal conditions. They’re not amorphous, pure mass like lumps of clay, neither do they have the phenomenal strength of rock or a piece of nature. They have a certain independence. Making them into shapes is an act of will on my part.’

For over four decades Deacon has used a wide range of material in his work, from wood and polycarbonate, to leather, cloth and ceramics. Bending, shaping, twisting and joining are just a few of the structural manipulations he applies, and in doing so tend to expose their own means of construction. Referring to himself as a ‘fabricator’, a term he uses to distinguish his methods from that of a carver or modeller, he explains:

‘I quite like the idea that a fabrication can be something made up rather than the truth. When you fabricate something it has a straightforward sense of making but it also has a sense of invention or make-believe. I always like that dual play. All the work I make is fundamentally made. It’s not cast or modelled or carved.’

You could say it’s his unique method of manipulating ordinary material that makes the ordinary extraordinary. I’ll leave that up to you to decide – but personally, I’m a big fan of the make-believe.

What do Richard Deacon’s sculptures mean to you? Tell us what you see

Richard Deacon is on display at Tate Britain until 27 April 2014

Read the original post on The Great Tate Mod Blog

Finally! A few words about FACT’s ongoing exhibition, Time & Motion: Redefining Working Life….

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San Precario, saint patron of the generation of workers holding precarious jobs

Original Films Of Frank B Gilbreth – Business Process Management

The title of the show is a direct reference to the Time & Motion Study, a method developed by Frederick Taylor (and later by Frank and Lillian Gilbreth) in the early 20th century to analyse work procedures and determine workers’ optimal productivity standards.

By bringing side by side archive material and contemporary artworks to explore how the working day has evolved from the industrial revolution to the digital age, Time & Motion: Redefining Working Life makes it quite clear that a lot has changed since the days of the good mister Taylor. Digital technology has brought numerous work opportunities, but also new rhythms: work accompanies freelances and employees whether they’re in an office, at home or in transit from one to the other and back. Some people juggle several jobs (no wonder at a time when a London flat earns more than a professional writer) and zero hour contracts are the ultimate expression of work ‘flexibility’.

Our economy has changed too, it is now mostly characterized by services and knowledge (whether they are outsourced or crowdsourced) and mass consumption coexists with models in which we are both consumers and producers.

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Installation at FACT as part of Time & Motion Redefining Working Life designed by Alon Meron. Image FACT Liverpool

In this context, what remains of the Eight Hour Day movement preconized by social reformer Robert Owen in the first half of the 19th century? Is there a new definition of ‘work life balance’?

Artists, along with anyone working in the cultural sector, have experienced this evolution of working standards perhaps more acutely than most people. It seemed thus natural that FACT, in collaboration with the Royal College of Art, would ask them to explore these questions. The result is timely, thought-provoking and at time, upsetting. Time & Motion will, i am sure, bring a new perspective on your working day.

I’ve actually already interviewed some of the artists in the show: last year, Revital Cohen and Tuur Van Balen told me about 75 Watt, an object for dancing in the factory line and last week, Oliver Walker explained his One Pound video installation.

Here’s a couple of works i found equally interesting:

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Sam Meech, Punchcard Economy, 2013. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

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Sam Meech, Punchcard Economy, 2013. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

Sam Meech, Punchcard Economy, 2013. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

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Sam Meech, Punchcard Economy, 2013. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

Sam Meech paid homage to the heritage of the local textile industry, whilst delineating contemporary working patterns in which digital technologies have enabled the blurring of work and private life.

Meech asked people working in the ‘creative industry’ to log their working hours on the project website. The data collected was compared to the traditional 8 hour shift and translated into a knitting pattern which was used to create a banner based on Owen’s ’8 hours labour, 8 hours recreation, 8 hours rest’ slogan.

The banner was produced on a domestic knitting machine using a combination of digital imaging tools and traditional punchcard systems.

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Tehching Hsieh, One Year Performance, 1980-81. Photograph and C. Tehching Hsieh

Between 1978 and 1986, Tehching Hsieh did a series of One Year Performances. He lived one year inside a cage, one year completely outdoors, one year tied to another person, one year without making, viewing, discussing, reading about, or in any other way participating in art (and as a consequence this last performance is barely documented.) A photo in the exhibition reminded us that in 1980-1981, the artist spent a whole year punching a workers’ time clock in his studio every hour. This last endeavour involved never being able to sleep for more than one hour running or not being allowed to leave his house for longer than 60 minutes.

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Blake Fall-Conroy, Minimum Wage Machine, 2008 – 2010. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

The Minimum Wage Machine allows visitors to work for minimum wage. Turning the crank will yield one penny every 5.7 seconds, for £6.31 an hour (UK minimum wage). If the participant stops turning the crank, they stop receiving money.

The process couldn’t be more transparent: you turn a handle, a clock records your effort and penny fall down as a reward. Ultra simple and cynical!

In the future, I see possibility in a lot of these machines hooked into a grid, with people performing basic human labor for money, Fall-Conroy told Make magazine. Perhaps a new form of renewable energy generation? A new kind of supercomputer with thousands of people performing basic calculations at minimum wage “stations” across the world? Who knows?

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Molleindustria, To Build a Better Mousetrap, 2013

Molleindustria‘s usual neat aesthetics casts a critical eye at the increasing popularity of online management games in which the user performs time-based tasks. The game examines the blurring of work and play and highlights the tensions between labour, automation, unemployment and repression.

Andrew Norman Wilson, Workers Leaving the Googleplex, 2011

Andrew Norman Wilson’s short video Workers Leaving the Googleplex draws a direct parallel with what is regarded as the first real motion picture ever made: the Lumière brothers’ silent film Workers Leaving the Lumière Factory. Wilson planted his camera in front of two Google locations in California to document the various levels of workers. It turns out that the possession of a badge of a certain colour dictates your place in the Google hierarchy and the amount of privileges you have access to. The artist manage to film very little as his efforts were stopped by Google security and resulted in the termination of his own employment at Google.

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Adrian McEwen, Marking Time, 2013. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

Adrian McEwen hacked an antique clock that used to regulate strict time management and remixed it with the retro mathematical Game of Life, created by John Horton Conway in 1970.

Each day a new game plays out, driven by the punch of the time clock. The mechanical action of the clock is combined with a computer which drives a nearby monitor – and also replayed on the LED screen at the front of the FACT building – to visualise the Game of Life grid and move it on a turn every time a timecard is stamped.

More images from the exhibition:

0Workers Leaving the Factory, Harun Farocki, 2006. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life.jpg
Harun Farocki, Workers Leaving the Factory, 2006. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

0Die Falle, Gregory Barsamian, 1997. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life.jpg
Gregory Barsamian, Die Falle, 1997. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

Gregory Barsamian‘s Die Falle (German for ‘The Trap’) is a zoetrope of a man’s dream-time reality.

Video over here.

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Installation at FACT as part of Time & Motion Redefining Working Life designed by Alon Meron

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Hybrid Lives Co-Working Space, The Creative Exchange, 2013. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

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75 Watt, Tuur Van Balen and Revital Cohen, 2013. Installation at FACT as part of Time & Motion Redefining Working Life

0Laborers of Love, Stephanie Rothenberg and Jeff Crouse, 2013. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life.jpg
Stephanie Rothenberg and Jeff Crouse, Laborers of Love, 2013. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

Electroboutique, iPaw. Video by FACT

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Electroboutique, iPaw, 2011. Installation at FACT as part of Time and Motion Redefining Working Life

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Time & Motion: Redefining Working Life is at FACT in Liverpool until Sunday 9 March 2014. The catalogue of the exhibition contains a series of essays by artists and curators reflecting on topics that range from Video games and the Spirit of Capitalism by Paolo Pedercini to an essay by Harun Farocki examining the cinematographic representation of factory workers (get the Time & Motion: Redefining Working Life book on amazon UK and USA)

Previously: The Chronocyclegraph, 75 Watt, an object for dancing in the factory line and All That is Solid Melts into Air: Jeremy Deller.

Read the original post on We make money not art

Pictorial Architecture Red, Yellow, Blue, Paul Klee, 1923
Pictorial Architecture Red, Yellow, Blue, Paul Klee, 1923

Zentrum Paul Klee

Last week in our Bauhaus lesson series, we learnt about Paul Klee’s teachings on line. This week we’re on to structure, and curator Matthew Gale helps us tackle a terrifying array of grids and numbers that surely can have nothing to do with painting…

So, back to Paul Klee’s unforgettably obscure teaching handbook, Pedagogical Sketchbook. Matthew, please explain why today’s pages looks like GSCE maths

Ah, well here Klee is thinking about structure in very simple mathematical terms, with the checker-board composition generated by number sequences.

But why would I want to pre-plan my painting in numbers?

Klee is exploring the idea that, rather than simply going ‘oh well, I rather fancy putting blue there’, you can create various logical sequences that give you different schemes. How can I draw a parallel with it? It’s like trying to think about colour in relation to accountancy, in a bizarre way. And to leap ahead a generation, when you look at the British artists on whom this sort of thing had a real impact, such as Mary and Kenneth Martin, they’re very fixated on how these numbering systems can be the basis for the art.

Can we see this approach – let’s call it art-countancy – in Klee’s own work?

Yes, some of these diagrams are very close to the basic elements that underlie the Magic Square paintings from 1923 and onwards (see Pictorial Architecture, Red, Yellow Blue above). But you can often see that he will set out a structure and then disrupt it – because he’s not actually interested in severe structure.

He’s ‘not that interested’? To quote the above page: ‘11+10+11+10+11+10= (11+10)+(11+10)+(11+10)=21+21+21=1+1+1

Well. My guess is that he’d say it simply gives you stability from which variety grows. He wouldn’t say ‘well, here’s your answer’. He’d say ‘well, here are the possibilities’. It was probably a bit flummoxing for his students.

You don’t say…

Disconcertingly, there’s a story that at the end of teaching this course, Klee would say well, I’ve shown you certain ways of making things, but I actually do it completely differently. And then he pushes off for a holiday!

That’s it for today. Here’s what we’ve learnt so far…

LESSON ONE: Learn the rules! Understanding the nature of mark-making is the key to creating a good composition

LESSON TWO: Break the rules. Understanding the potential structure of form allows you to disrupt it

NEXT WEEK… Why nature has the answers

Two lessons down, what are your thoughts on Klee’s Pedagogical Sketchbook teachings? Have you got your head around them to use in your art work? Let us know!

Read the original post on The Great Tate Mod Blog

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HaggBridge.com brings you a daily update of news from art world, focused on UK based artists, exhibitions, and galleries.